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Little Free Pantry helps those experiencing food insecurity

 

Last updated 6/9/2020 at 12:23pm

Brian Soergel

Deborah Binder and her husband, Gaetan Veilleux, created a Little Free Pantry in Edmonds.

About 10 years ago, my husband and I installed a Little Free Library (LFL) in our front yard in the Maplewood neighborhood of Edmonds. We were early adopters of the library, and we have enjoyed the free exchange of books from friends and neighbors.

Part of the mission of our library is ovarian cancer awareness, as I am an 11-year survivor. Besides books, I stock information about symptoms and treatments as well as retreats for ovarian cancer survivors for library visitors to take for themselves or to share.

Last month I read an article in the Seattle Times about Molly Harmon, a personal chef, who started building Little Free Pantries (LFP) for her neighborhood.

The idea, modeled on the Little Free Library concept, is simple and straightforward: "Take What You Need, Leave What You Can." The pantries are filled by people in the community, and those in need are encouraged to come by and take what they can use.

I immediately felt inspired and contacted Molly of the Little Free Pantries (thelittlefreepantries.org/). She delivered her basic "food pantry" kit to us and then we sanded, painted and put a sturdy roof on it.

Someone from a Facebook Marketplace listing donated an old wooden stool that we reinforced with rebar and brackets to use as the base for our own Little Free Pantry. I reached out to neighbors on the Edmonds Neighbors Facebook group to find someone with sign painting skills, and Liesl stepped up for us and created two magnificent signs for the LFP.

We installed our Edmonds Little Free Pantry next to our Little Free Library. And before we could even announce its installation, the box was brimming with food. It even has its own Facebook page so that I can leave updates about it for the public to see (facebook.com/Edmonds-Little-Free-Pantry-107202337665539/).

We are located just off Main Street and Maplewood Drive about one block from a major bus stop. Traffic is starting to pick up and we hope that people will start spreading the word.

Due to health department regulations, we are only allowed to offer nonperishables. We've been keeping it full with pasta, soups, canned and dried beans, canned tuna and chicken, canned fruits and vegetables, boxed mixes such as macaroni and cheese, applesauce cups, granola bars, personal hygiene products, baby food, snacks, and even homemade masks that several people have donated.

We add new items to the LFP on a daily basis, but it's our generous neighbors all around Edmonds who anonymously drop off bags of goods. We encourage folks to leave healthy items and encourage people to buy something extra when they go to the store so that they can donate to the Edmonds Little Free Pantry.

I know some people reading this article will be surprised to learn that many people living in Edmonds suffer from food insecurity.

Brian Soergel

Deborah Binder and her husband, Gaetan Veilleux, created a Little Free Pantry in Edmonds.

This has been a challenging time for people and putting three meals per day together for a family – especially if you have been furloughed or laid off – can be an overwhelming challenge.

It's a blessing that the Edmonds School District has continued to provide free meals five days per week for families.

The Edmonds Little Free Pantry does not replace food banks or the generosity of local food vendors/restaurateurs. My husband and I contribute to Food Lifeline every year, but we wanted to provide a local way of offering help during the pandemic.

We hope that you will consider checking out our brand new Edmonds Little Free Pantry if you are in need at this time or if you are able to donate nonperishable items. Thank you for your support of this local movement.

 

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